Aug 112016
 

T-Rex

Purchase Tickets

I’m happy to announce that I’ll be teaching one of the first workshops at Make Nashville‘s brand new space!

The class is called “Papercraft Automata” and is open to students ages 11 and up. (Younger students are welcome with parental accompaniment.) If the first class is successful, I hope to make it a continuing series.

Using Rob Ives’ wonderful paper automata designs, I will teach you the basics of mechanical movement. Each class will explore a different mechanical movement concept including crank sliders, scotch yokes, geneva cranks, gear boxes, worm gears, rack and pinions, and more

In the first class, we will learn all about cams by building the Hungry T-Rex Dinosaur! This is a great introduction to mechanical movement because the kit provides several sets of cams that change the dinosaur’s animation.

Cams have been around for hundreds of years. They are the main mechanical principal behind self-writing, self-drawing, and music-playing automata such as the one featured in the movie Hugo. There’s so much you can do with this one simple concept!

Date: Sunday, August 21 from 12pm to 4pm.
Location: Make Nashville, 947 Woodland St, Nashville, TN
Class fee: $7 for Make Nashville makerspace members. $12 for non-members.

We will supply all tools and components, however if you have a favorite cutting mat, pair of scissors, or Exacto-knife, feel free to bring it along.

Buy your tickets here. This class is limited to 18 students and is expected to sell out, so reserve your spot quick.

Learn more about the Hungry T-Rex here.

Purchase Tickets

Sep 162014
 

The 2014 Nashville Mini Maker Faire was last Saturday, and I had an absolute blast! Erica Ciccarone and I displayed 3D-printed objects and textile art at the Make Nashville booth. I also taught a papercrafting course using Rob Ives‘ wonderful paper automata.

Here are some pictures Erica and I took at the Faire:

 

Our Make Nashville booth. Photo by Erica.

Our Make Nashville booth and Erica’s Fancy Fox quilt. Photo by Erica.

Our Make Nashville booth. Photo by Erica.

Our Make Nashville booth. Photo by Erica.

Our Make Nashville booth. Photo by Erica.

Some 3D printed inventions in our Make Nashville booth. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

I demonstrate how to make your own carbonated soda. Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

A local artist asked people to draw their favorite places in Nashville. Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

A local artist asked people to draw their favorite places in Nashville. Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

A local artist asked people to draw their favorite places in Nashville. A Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

A local artist asked people to draw their favorite places in Nashville. Photo by Erica.

Bubbles! Photo by Erica.

Bubbles! Photo by Erica.

Bubbles! Photo by Erica.

Bubbles! Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

This guy. Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

Some young makers. Photo by Erica.

A suspicious face at the origami booth. Photo by Erica.

A suspicious origami artist. Photo by Erica.

Origami club. Photo by Erica.

Origami club. Photo by Erica.

Origami club. Photo by Erica.

Origami club. Photo by Erica.

Photo by Erica.

A future refrigerator poet. Photo by Erica.

Puppets! Photo by Erica.

Puppets! Photo by Erica.

Puppets! Photo by Erica.

Puppets! Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata, and Erica enjoys the company of a future engineer. Photo by Tony.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives' papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

I teach a course on Rob Ives’ papercraft automata. Photo by Erica.

 

Mar 312014
 
SimpleMetal

Printrbot Simple Metal

Maker group Make Nashville, of which I’m a member, is helping an Antioch High School engineering class crowdfund a 3D printer. By donating, you will have a direct impact on the lives of area students. There’s nothing quite so thrilling as designing your own thing on a 3D modeling program and then watching it become a tangible object on a 3D printer.

The campaign ends in 2 days, and we’ve only just reached our starting goal. Head on over and give what you can. We may not be able to bump the total up to LulzBot Taz 3 level, but I think we can reach the Printrbot Simple Metal Kit, a dang good printer for a great price that was listed for sale after our campaign began.

Jul 182013
 

1052894_395555853899342_517272591_o

I love making stuff. I’ve had a subscription to Make Magazine since issue #6, and every year I wish I had the funds to go to the Bay Area Maker Faire. Those of you who’ve attended the Circuit Benders’ Ball know how vital making is to experimental music culture.

I’m part of a local maker’s group called Make Nashville (which recently merged with HackNash). We’re one of the groups partnering with the Adventure Science Center to bring the Maker Faire to Nashville.

Yes, you heard correctly. Nashville is getting a Maker Faire. The Nashville Mini Maker Faire takes place on Saturday, September 21, 2013 from 10am to 5pm at the Adventure Science Center. (“Like” the Faire on Facebook here.)

The call for makers is now open, and we’re looking for exhibitors, speakers, teachers, performers and volunteers. Participating is absolutely free, but time is running out to submit. The application deadline is August 1st at 11:59pm.

As the Director of Performances, I’m seeking musicians, acting troupes, magicians, puppeteers, multi-media artist, science presenters, and pretty much anyone who has an act that happens on a stage. The performances NEED to involve making. If you’re a circuit bender or instrument designer, you’re golden. If you make your own costumes that show off your unique flair, we want you. In short, we’re looking for makers who perform.

The faire will be free and open to the public. Because our funding is limited, we are unable to compensate participants. That may change as the Nashville Faire expands in subsequent years.

if you’re interested in performing or any other form of involvement, go fill out an application. Do it now. The sooner the better.