Apr 132016
 

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Circuit Benders’ Ball is a biennial celebration of hardware hacking, free culture, art, and the creative spirit. I’ve been running the show since the festival’s inception in 2010. The three-day event at Fort Houston in 2014 was our biggest and best yet. We have a venue lined up for September 2016, and we’re preparing to send out calls for participants. There’s just one thing we need:

A new producer.

I’ve reached the unfortunate conclusion that with all the other things on my plate, most notably Modular Art Pods @ OZ, I won’t be able to devote the time necessary to put on CBB. I’d still like to pitch in, perhaps even finally perform at the fest, but I’m looking for someone else to take the reins. So, what would this involve?

The 2016 CBB producer would be responsible for:

  • Assembling the lineup of performers, visual artists, workshop teachers, and presenters.
  • Fundraising. Seeking money through sponsorships, funding drives, pre-sales, etc.
  • Building a team of volunteers to help with all aspects of the show.
  • Negotiating and fulfilling payment/travel expenses with the venue and artists.
  • Finding places for the touring artists to stay.
  • Promotion.

I won’t lie. The hardest part is the money. The organizing side of CBB has always been all-volunteer, from the producer to the visual art directors to the sound engineers to the ticket takers. After expenses, all of the funds have gone to the touring performers, although never as much as they deserve … and never enough to properly compensate the local performers. We’d love for that to change this year.

This would also mean that you, the incoming producer, would also be volunteering your time. You may be able to strategize ways to increase revenue and allow enough for a producer’s salary. If you can make that happen and still fairly compensate the performers, more power to you.

I would make myself available to answer any of your questions and help out in any way I can.  You would have free rein to run the festival as you see fit, except for the following core rules:

  • Performances must involve circuit bending, creative coding, instrument building, or modular rigs (especially if the modules are homemade or heavily-modded). In the past, we’ve also included music made with Gameboys because of the homebrew cartridges.
  • Producers must be committed to inclusivity. Producers should seek out a diverse lineup of performers that include women, people of color, people with disabilities, and people in the LGBT communities.
  • The Code of Conduct should reflect that spirit of inclusivity by fostering a safe environment for all guests.

The new producer will be chosen by me and group of past CBB staff. A producer that lives in or near Nashville, TN is heavily preferred. If selected, you will produce the 2016 edition, and if all goes well, you’ll have the option to produce future editions. Interested parties should e-mail me at tonyyoungblood@gmail.com.

Mar 082016
 

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Nashville composer, coder, oboist, new media artist, and Circuit Benders’ Ball alum Robbie Lynn Hunsinger will perform Friday, March 11 at 8 p.m. at the Centennial Black Box Theatre. The event is a part of Metro Parks’ experimental arts series Free Form Friday.

Hunsinger will be joined by award-winning double-bassist Missy Raines and Nashville Symphony English horn player Roger Wiesmeyer. Hunsinger will perform on oboe, saxophone, Irish whistles, and various electronic gear. Expect a guest appearance by the Arduino drummer (although this time it may switch from snare to cymbal).

Rumor has it that Hunsinger may be bringing a scaled-down version of her phenomenal Frist Museum interactive installation Blue-Yellow-Red. (Read about Blue-Yellow-Red in Make Magazine.)

Like all Free Form Fridays, this event is FREE. To learn more about Free Form Friday, check out my Nashville Arts interview with Mike Teaney.

Ebenezer Creek for Two English Horns, Bass & Interactive Video – Excerpt from Robbie Lynn Hunsinger on Vimeo.

“Blue-Yellow-Red” interview with Robbie Lynn Hunsinger from Robbie Lynn Hunsinger on Vimeo.

Duet for Arduino & Soprano Sax from Robbie Lynn Hunsinger on Vimeo.

Free Form Friday presents Robbie Lynn Hunsinger, Missy Raines, and Roger Wiesmeyer
Friday, March 11, 8 p.m., free show, all ages
@ Centennial Black Box Theater, 211 27th. Avenue North, Nashville, TN 37213

Jan 182016
 

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For the past four years, David Landry has been toiling away at a graphic novel about the life of Nikola Tesla. But no ordinary graphic novel. The panels are full-sized paintings, and the “pages” are up to ten feet tall.

Landry has been showing glimpses of the work a few panels at a time during Art & Music @ Wedgewood/Houston events at his gallery-in-residence, abrasiveMedia. There on January 30 from 6 to 9 p.m., he’ll unveil the entire 321 painting saga. The opening will also feature costumes, props, and models from the world of Th3 Anomaly as well as character encounters and a steampunk costume contest.

It’s safe to say that you’ve never been to a show quite like this. Don’t miss it! Learn more on the Facebook event page.

Th3 Anomaly
January 30, 2016, 6 – 9 p.m., $5-$35
@ abrasiveMedia, inside Houston Station, 438 Houston St, Ste 257, Nashville, Tennessee 37203

Nov 042015
 

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East Nashville’s Gallery Luperca has some cool shows coming up, including a Michael Nott photography show in December and the Lindsay Goranson directed play Manuscript November 6 through 14. I interviewed Goranson about the play and her move to Nashville in the October edition of Nashville Arts Magazine.

Gallery Luperca also recently opened a call for artists for the January show No Skyline Nashville. Here’s an excerpt of the press release:

Gallery Luperca invites artists who currently live in, have lived in, or have been influenced by time spent in Nashville to create work about this place that we love.  For this show we want to celebrate all the aspects of life in Nashville WITHOUT referencing the skyline.

When you think of art about Nashville, do repeated images of the skyline flash through your mind? Perhaps rainbow tinted batman buildings?  What does art about Nashville look like if it doesn’t look like the downtown skyline?  We’re set to find out.

Gallery Luperca is located in East Nashville, a creative, thriving neighborhood of artists and musicians. Accepted work will be on display January 9 through January 30, with an opening reception in conjunction with the East Side Art Stumble on Saturday January 9 from 6 to 10 p.m.

This call is open to all 2 and 3 dimensional art forms, including but not necessarily limited to painting, drawing, illustration, mixed media, photography, sculpture, and digital media.  With reasonable exceptions for photography and digital art, no reproductions will be considered.  Unframed canvases must be gallery wrapped and wired. Art must be properly wired and ready for display.  Please keep artwork under 18” on the longest side.  You are welcome to submit up to 5 pieces.

Find out more at GalleryLuperca.com.