Aug 252013
 

Craig-Schenker

There are two great events happening in the Wedgewood-Houston neighborhood tonight, and as the scheduling gods have ordained, you should be able to catch (at least most of) both.

The first happens from 7pm to 9:30pm at the Notable Blends coffeehouse inside Houston Station. Tony Gerber and Bryan Burnett‘s space music project Auroric Dreams will perform to the live OpenGL visuals of artist Josh Gumiela.

From the Facebook event page:

Back together for a second live concert for the Nashville audience, Auroric Dreams will be performing live space music during the astronomical event, Neptune’s Opposition 2013 at the enchanting and intimate venue of Noteable Blends. Join us for a cosmic evening of music from Tony Gerber and Bryan Burnett and original motion graphic projections by video and sound installation artist, Josh Gumiela.

At Noa Noa house from 8:30pm to 12am, saxophonist Craig Schenker will perform his final Nashville show before moving to New York. Craig is one of the hardest working musicians in Nashville, having played with Square People, Lyrebird, Four Sided Circle, ArclyteAfton Wolfe, Lylas, Cenobium, and more.  He’s been on a whopping 17 Theatre Intangible episodes, and that doesn’t include several that are waiting to be published, including a Lyrebird artist showcase.

At his farewell show, Craig will conduct extemporaneous assemblies of past collaborators. The Facebook event page says Craig will,

curate the evening alternating pre-determined group/acts with spontaneous improvisational duos and trios chosen the night of the show.

Confirmed performers include:

If you know Craig or are a fan of his music, don’t miss this intimate final show. While there is a bit of an overlap between the two Wedgewood-Houston events, I’m guessing you’ll miss no more than 30 minutes of the latter if you decide to attend the former.

Auroric Dreams w/ visuals by Josh Gumiela
Sunday, August 25th, 7pm-9:30pm, $10

@ Notable Blends (inside Houston Station)
434 Houston Street
Nashville, Tennessee 3720

Craig Schenker’s Last Nashville Hurrah
Sunday, August 25th, 8:30pm-12am, free

@Noa Noa (house)
620 Hamilton Avenue
Nashville, TN 37203

May 082013
 
Thomas Lehn & John Butcher, St. Louis, 06-08-2012. Photo by Joseph Raglani

Thomas Lehn & John Butcher, St. Louis, 06-08-2012. Photo by Joseph Raglani

For the 100th Theatre Intangible podcast, we’ve been saving a very special performance: the Thomas Lehn and John Butcher artist showcase.

This is a recording of their spectacular June 7th, 2012 performance at Downtown Presbyterian Church. Thomas and John very graciously allowed me to release the recording as a  podcast.

This rare event was organized by Brady Sharp, Chris Davis, and David Maddox.

Here’s an excerpt from my Nashville Scene Critic’s Pick:

“Thomas Lehn and John Butcher are two of the most important players in the European free improv scene. Lehn plays unearthly sounds out of an EMS Synthi A, a unique 1970s analog synthesizer that supplants the Moog-style patch bay for a matrix of Battleship-like resistor pegs. His sputtering, crackling, and at times combative timbres are just as unique as the instrument he plays, and a far cry from the soothing tones of ambient electronic music.

If Evan Parker is the pioneer of extended saxophone technique, John Butcher is the lab scientist. Formerly a theoretical physicist, Butcher meticulously catalogs every sound he discovers on the sax — and I do mean every sound. Where most musical adventurers remain content mapping out the big spaces in the middle, Butcher charts every crack, crevice and blind alley. He’s famous for treating the room as an extension of the instrument (having recorded in caves, oil tanks and underground reservoirs), and you can be sure the amazing acoustics of the chapel at DPC will play a big part in both players’ performances.”

The acoustics of the space did play a big part of the performance. The reverb you hear on the recording is in fact the chapel’s natural room reverb.

This was a very special performance, and I’m indebted to Brady, Chris, and Dave for putting the show together and to Thomas and John for bringing their talents to Nashville.

Also, I’d like to take a moment to thank all of the talented performers who have ever appeared on Theatre Intangible. 100 episodes down. Here’s to 100 more.

As always, thanks for listening.