Dec 162013
 

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It’s my pleasure to announce the date and location for the 2014 Nashville Circuit Benders’ Ball. The biennial daylong festival celebrating hardware hacking, art, music and the creative spirit will take place at Fort Houston on Saturday, April 12th, 2014. The 2012 Ball took place at Brick Factory, Fort Houston’s previous location and moniker, and we’re pleased to be partnering with them again. 2010 and 2012 art directors Megan Kelley and Stephen Zerne return for 2014. 2012 participant Josh Gumiela and Brighton, England noise artist and promoter Geo Leonard will chair the event with me.

We’re working hard preparing the CBB website, call for artists, Kickstarter campaign and more. Stay tuned to Theatre Intangible for more Ball announcements in the coming weeks!

Nov 042013
 

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Robbie Lynn Hunsinger is a Nashville-based musician, multimedia artist, hacker, coder, and all-around amazing person. She collaborated with architect Douglas Garofalo on a Museum of Contemporary Art installation. She’s also a Grammy-winning oboist with the Chicago Symphony. We’re extremely fortunate to have her in Nashville.

On Sunday, November 10th, Robbie is teaching a class on creative coding at Boheme Collectif. If you’ve ever wanted to integrate an Xbox Kinect or Wiimote into your project or learn the software programs Processing and Pure Data, this class is for you.  No prior experience is necessary. This class is part two in a series. If you missed the first class, don’t worry. It’s not a prerequisite. Robbie will do a brief review.

Here are the details:

Creative Code 101 for Makers, Musicians & Artists 
With interactive artist & teacher Robbie Hunsinger
Class fee: $35

Second installment! Beginner class in writing creative code for interactive art and music. Bring in your images, sounds and video and we will explore using them with Processing. Robbie will also introduce Pure Data, another amazingly powerful program that many of us use with sound work. Processing and Pure Data are both cross-platform

What to Bring:

  • Laptop with Processing and Pure Data installed. (Free via the links)
  • Headphones or earbuds.
  • Media files (mp3, mov, jpeg, tiff, etc) for use in class.
  • Webcam highly recommended

Please RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Creative Code 101 for Makers, Musicians & Artists
Sunday, November 10th, 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
$35
@ Boheme Collectif
919 Gallatin Ave.
Suite 8
Nashville, Tennessee 37206

Jul 182013
 

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I love making stuff. I’ve had a subscription to Make Magazine since issue #6, and every year I wish I had the funds to go to the Bay Area Maker Faire. Those of you who’ve attended the Circuit Benders’ Ball know how vital making is to experimental music culture.

I’m part of a local maker’s group called Make Nashville (which recently merged with HackNash). We’re one of the groups partnering with the Adventure Science Center to bring the Maker Faire to Nashville.

Yes, you heard correctly. Nashville is getting a Maker Faire. The Nashville Mini Maker Faire takes place on Saturday, September 21, 2013 from 10am to 5pm at the Adventure Science Center. (“Like” the Faire on Facebook here.)

The call for makers is now open, and we’re looking for exhibitors, speakers, teachers, performers and volunteers. Participating is absolutely free, but time is running out to submit. The application deadline is August 1st at 11:59pm.

As the Director of Performances, I’m seeking musicians, acting troupes, magicians, puppeteers, multi-media artist, science presenters, and pretty much anyone who has an act that happens on a stage. The performances NEED to involve making. If you’re a circuit bender or instrument designer, you’re golden. If you make your own costumes that show off your unique flair, we want you. In short, we’re looking for makers who perform.

The faire will be free and open to the public. Because our funding is limited, we are unable to compensate participants. That may change as the Nashville Faire expands in subsequent years.

if you’re interested in performing or any other form of involvement, go fill out an application. Do it now. The sooner the better.

Jul 132013
 
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Z-Vex custom painted pedals.

I was able score a free pass to Summer NAMM today at the new Music City Center here in Nashville. Since I haven’t had a chance to explore the brand new convention center and I hadn’t been to Summer NAMM in a few years, I figured this was a convergence of opportunities.

Parking at the Music City Center was surprisingly hassle-free. The center is so huge, 6th Avenue actually runs underneath it. From 6th, I entered the ground-level lot and quickly found a space. The parking cost was only $6 today, but I believe it’s normally $12 for up to 8 hours.

As gargantuan as the center seems from outside, it’s actually a little underwhelming indoors. I was expecting Summer NAMM to expand to the space, but the convention used only half of the available exhibit floor. Summer NAMM 2013 seemed no larger than Summer NAMM 2010 at the Nashville Convention Center.

My friend Paul Horton and I walked all over the new facility, trying to find a way out to the grass-carpeted roof. The closest we could come was a windowed view (see picture below). Sadly, the coolest part of the new convention center appears to be permanently off-limits to convention goers.

I enjoyed my time at Summer NAMM 2013. Scroll down for my picture and video highlights.

Inside the Music City Center.

Inside the Music City Center.

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The closest we came to the grass-lined roof.

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Inside the exhibit area.

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I am still fascinated by plastic trombones.

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I love my Marantz digital field recorder, but these Tascams give it a run for its money. The DR-60D is designed especially for DSLR videographers.

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My favorite guitar company: Reverend.

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Believe it or not, these guitars are actually tiny. axeheaven.com “The world’s finest handcrafted miniature guitars.”

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Pigtronix analog effects.

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Z-Vex, one of the most innovative effects companies on the planet.

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Nashville’s own Griffin Technology.

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Flying V Electric Violin.

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T-Rex Effects.

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Klops takes your vintage guitar cabinet speakers and places them inside these cylinders to minimize phasing and muddy tones.